Saint Joseph's coach Phil Martelli says he didn't know he was being mimicked during the Atlantic 10 championship until he saw the video of his 4-year-old grandson on YouTube.

Martelli was too busy coaching to notice little Philip Martelli in his coat and tie, sitting a couple rows behind him and copying his moves during the Hawks' 65-61 win over Virginia Commonwealth on Sunday.

When Phil crossed his arms, Philip crossed his arms. When Phil put his hand to his chin, so did Philip.

Philip even brought his own white board to the game to draw up plays during timeouts.

And he celebrated when his grandfather's Hawks won, earning a date with UConn in the first round of the NCAA tournament on Thursday.

"What I saw coming home on that bus, those YouTube clips, I about lost it," Martelli said Monday during a conference call.

The video has gone viral, leading to several national television appearances for the younger Martelli, who has been a sidekick to his grandfather for a while.

The elder Martelli said his grandson has attended his press conferences, talking to reporters at the end of each one.

The two also share pregame rituals, laying out their clothes in a certain way, saying the same prayers in the same order, even refusing to carry money on game days.

Last week, they were preparing for the trip to Brooklyn and the A-10 tournament when 4-year-old Philip had a clothing question for his grandfather.

"He looks at me, and he says 'Tug,' he calls me Tug, he said, 'Tug, do you think this is an appropriate tie?'" Martelli said. "I was like, 'Who at 4-years-old uses the word appropriate.'"

It's been a tough year for the Martellis.

The 59-year-old coach endured several deaths in his family, including both his sister and a sister-in-law. One of his sons, Jimmy, lost a job as an assistant coach at Rutgers during the Mike Rice scandal. And Martelli he faced a lot of questions about his own professional future after his team failed to make the tournament a year ago.

Little Philip and his sister Marra stay with their grandparents while Phil Jr. is working as an assistant coach at Delaware.

"Those two little kids, without knowing what they were doing, just their enjoyment of life, helped my wife and I really get to the other side so to speak," Martelli said.