FILE - In this Sept. 16, 2019, file photo, Gov. Gavin Newsom answers a question during a news conference in Sacramento, Calif. Newsom announced Monday, Sept. 30, he signed a law that would let athletes at California universities make money from their images, names or likenesses. The law also bans schools from kicking athletes off the team if they get paid. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
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SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The Latest on California Gov. Gavin Newsom signing a law allowing college athletes to make money from endorsements (all times local):

2:45 p.m.

Former University of Michigan basketball player Jordan Poole said he supports a new California law letting college athletes sign endorsement deals, saying it could have let him make money from a game-winning shot in the NCAA tournament this year.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a bill into law on Monday that lets college athletes in the state hire agents and sign endorsement deals.

Poole, who now plays for the Golden State Warriors, hit a game-winning shot for Michigan against Houston in the second round of the NCAA tournament in March while millions watched on live TV. Poole told reporters Monday he could have capitalized on that fame.

Poole called the law a "huge step in the right direction," saying college players make a lot of money for their schools.

1:45 p.m.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom does not believe the NCAA can afford to ban the state's schools from its athletic competitions.

Newsom announced Monday he had signed a bill into law allowing college athletes in California to hire agents and sign endorsement deals.

The NCAA board of governors had asked Newsom not to sign the law, arguing it would give California schools an unfair recruiting advantage and bar them from competition.

But Newsom said Monday he doesn't believe the NCAA will eventually prohibit teams from California universities. The law goes into effect in 2023.

As the country's most populous state, California is home to numerous college and university athletic programs, including four in the Pac-12 conference.

NCAA officials said they are considering their next steps, but did not elaborate.

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9 a.m

The sponsors of a new California law allowing college athletes to financially benefit from endorsements are calling the signing of their bill by Gov. Gavin Newsom a historic moment.

Democratic State Sen. Nancy Skinner says for decades college sports has generated billions of dollars for all involved except the people most responsible for creating the wealth.

Early Monday, Newsom tweeted a video of the signing recorded during a special episode of HBO's "The Shop: Uninterrupted."

Democratic State Sen. Steven Bradford is also a bill sponsor and says the issue is a civil rights issue involving fairness and equity.

Bradford says universities and the NCAA make millions off student athletes' talent and labor while athletes struggle to get by.

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8:15 a.m.

The NCAA says a new California law allowing college student athletes to earn money from endorsements is creating confusion for current and future athletes, coaches, administrators and schools.

The NCAA responded Monday after California Gov. Gavin Newsom tweeted a video of himself signing the bill during a special episode of HBO's "The Shop: Uninterrupted."

The NCAA says changes are needed to continue to support student-athletes, but improvement needs to happen on a national level through the NCAA's rules-making process.

The NCAA says it is considering its next steps in California but did not elaborate.

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7:35 a.m.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom says a law he has signed to allow college athletes to make money from endorsements is a rebalancing of the power arrangement between athletes and institutions.

Newsom tweeted a video early Monday showing him signing the law during a special episode of HBO's "The Shop: Uninterrupted" alongside basketball star LeBron James and other athletes.

The governor says the first-in-the-nation law will cause dozens of other states to introduce similar legislation and it will change college sports for the better by putting athletes on par with the interests of institutions.

The NCAA Board of Governors had asked Newsom to veto the bill, saying it "would erase the critical distinction between college and professional athletes

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7:14 a.m.

California will let college athletes hire agents and make money from endorsements, defying the NCAA and setting up a likely legal challenge that could reshape U.S. amateur sports.

Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Monday he has signed a law that allowing athletes at California universities make money from their images, names or likenesses. The law also bans schools from kicking athletes off the team if they get paid.

California is the first state to pass such a law.

The law takes effect on Jan. 1, 2023. It does not apply to community colleges and bans athletes from accepting endorsement deals conflicting with their schools' existing contracts.

The NCAA Board of Governors had asked Newsom to veto the bill, saying it "would erase the critical distinction between college and professional athletes."